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What makes foie gras special?

Foie Gras is unique in sensory terms. Sensory science is the study of the perception of aroma properties and the consistency of food.

The taste: Foie Gras and also Happy Foie create a unique combination of fine, nutty aromas and the slightly bitter taste of spicy liver. What is also unique is that Foie Gras and Happy Foie can be combined flexibly with almost all flavors - whether with sweet and sour fruit jams or with a hearty steak.

The melt: Foie Gras and also Happy Foie are particularly characterized by their “rush melt” - that is, they do not melt slowly, linearly and continuously in the mouth - but melt at a certain point Temperature in the mouth all of a sudden. Foie Gras also has an “endothermic melting behavior”. This means that you feel a cooling effect on your tongue when foie gras or happy foie melts in your mouth.

How can Happy Foie be “unstuffed”?

We take ordinary livers from healthy, free-range animals. These animals do not naturally have a fatty liver (fatty liver = French foie gras). In the Food Lab in Münster we have developed a process with which we can subsequently enrich these normal livers with fat (post mortem) and enhance them. We only process animal and vegetable fats and do not use any artificial additives.

As a result, the fats in Happy Foie are just as finely distributed as in foie gras or fatty liver grown in animals through forced feeding.

How do Happy Foie Goose and Happy Foie Duck differ?

Duck liver is traditionally a bit stronger. The goose liver is a little finer and milder in taste. The demand for Happy Foie duck predominates in French-speaking regions, where foie gras is traditionally associated with duck liver. In German-speaking countries, however, Happy Foie Goose is the most popular variant. Both variants can be served, processed and combined identically - personal taste decides.

The new standard

Why is Happy Foie the alternative to conventional Bloc Foie Gras?

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